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Thread: Watch That Dress Code!

  1. #41
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    Well, I remind myself every now and again that while I aspire to be as close to God as I can be, I am not him and have no presumption as to even think I can think like he does. All I know is what I translate from reading the bible. And when someone asks me what sin is worse, murder or lieing, I say "Yes".

    Sin is sin, and all the same to him as far as I can see. The only sin that cannot be forgiven is non belief.

    So my question is which sin is OK so that it does not get you a one way ticket to hell? The answer, as far as I can determine, is none save for denying the holy spirit. Short of that, a lies is as good as a murder for what God considers sin. And there are plenty of others tossed in there as well. And I am studying what the difference in translation is for the words of murder and killing (taking another life) as depicted in the 10 commandments. If I read it right the commandment says thou shalt not kill, but the general translation means more like "take anothers life without provocation". But no matter how you spell it or translate it, we have all fallen short of the mark. That is the translation for the word sin..... falling short of the mark or not measuring up.

    A pretty smart guy I know told me that salvation comes in 3 stages. Salvation, sanctification, and glorification. One frees you of the consequences of sin, the next frees you from the temptation of sin, and the last saves you from the presence (existence) of sin. Now... That made a lot of sense to me.
    We have met the enemy and he is us... POGO

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by txswimmer View Post
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    ... And what says the Catholic (western) church of the Greek and Russian Orthodox churches?
    Since you asked:

    Orthodox-Catholic dialogue began with the warming of relations that took place between the two churches in the 1960s. From the Catholic perspective, the convocation of the Second Vatican Council heralded a greater appreciation of Orthodoxy. A positive evaluation of the Orthodox is found in the Council documents, including a favorable assessment of their many legitimate traditions that diverge from Latin practice, and an unqualified recognition of the validity of Orthodox sacraments. These events resulted in a "dialogue of charity." In January 1964 Pope Paul VI and Patriarch Athenagoras of Constantinople met in Jerusalem. On 7 December 1965, the mutual excommunications of 1054 were lifted and "erased from the memory" of the Church.

    In 1976 the churches established the "Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church" to prepare for an official dialogue. In 1978 the joint commission submitted a document to the authorities of both churches in which it recommended that the goal of the dialogue be clearly defined as the reestablishment of full communion. The official announcement of the beginning of the theological dialogue was made jointly by Pope John Paul II and Patriarch Dimitrios I in Istanbul on 30 November 1979. The "Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church" includes bishops and theologians in equal numbers from both churches, the Orthodox side including representatives from all of the autocephalous and autonomous churches. The first of several plenary session took place on the Greek islands of Patmos and Rhodes in 1980.

    The reconciliation process is ongoing, although the 1989 collapse of the communist regimes in Eastern Europe caused a significant crisis in Catholic-Orthodox relations because of the reemergence of Eastern Catholic Churches that had been suppressed by the communists. Ugly confrontations arose between Eastern Catholics and Orthodox over Eastern Catholic property that had been confiscated by the communist authorities decades earlier and given to the Orthodox.

    The final goal of unity between Catholics and all the Eastern churches remains a Christian imperative that corresponds to nothing less than the will of Jesus Christ himself. It is indisputable that severe problems must still be resolved. Nevertheless, these sister churches, long embittered by the misunderstandings and wounds of the past have in recent decades been experiencing the rekindling of an ancient love. In doing so, and in responding in creative ways to the challenges posed by the process of reconciliation, the unity of our world will be strengthened, and God will be praised.
    SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM

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  4. #43
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    I'm really glad that that a dress code topic shifted to yet another religious discussion. {/sarcasm}

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  6. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by kantwin View Post
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    I'm really glad that that a dress code topic shifted to yet another religious discussion. {/sarcasm}
    I put my suit on just to read this discussion ...
    The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.

  7. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ludwig View Post
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    Since you asked:

    Orthodox-Catholic dialogue began with the warming of relations that took place between the two churches in the 1960s. From the Catholic perspective, the convocation of the Second Vatican Council heralded a greater appreciation of Orthodoxy. A positive evaluation of the Orthodox is found in the Council documents, including a favorable assessment of their many legitimate traditions that diverge from Latin practice, and an unqualified recognition of the validity of Orthodox sacraments. These events resulted in a "dialogue of charity." In January 1964 Pope Paul VI and Patriarch Athenagoras of Constantinople met in Jerusalem. On 7 December 1965, the mutual excommunications of 1054 were lifted and "erased from the memory" of the Church.

    In 1976 the churches established the "Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church" to prepare for an official dialogue. In 1978 the joint commission submitted a document to the authorities of both churches in which it recommended that the goal of the dialogue be clearly defined as the reestablishment of full communion. The official announcement of the beginning of the theological dialogue was made jointly by Pope John Paul II and Patriarch Dimitrios I in Istanbul on 30 November 1979. The "Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church" includes bishops and theologians in equal numbers from both churches, the Orthodox side including representatives from all of the autocephalous and autonomous churches. The first of several plenary session took place on the Greek islands of Patmos and Rhodes in 1980.

    The reconciliation process is ongoing, although the 1989 collapse of the communist regimes in Eastern Europe caused a significant crisis in Catholic-Orthodox relations because of the reemergence of Eastern Catholic Churches that had been suppressed by the communists. Ugly confrontations arose between Eastern Catholics and Orthodox over Eastern Catholic property that had been confiscated by the communist authorities decades earlier and given to the Orthodox.

    The final goal of unity between Catholics and all the Eastern churches remains a Christian imperative that corresponds to nothing less than the will of Jesus Christ himself. It is indisputable that severe problems must still be resolved. Nevertheless, these sister churches, long embittered by the misunderstandings and wounds of the past have in recent decades been experiencing the rekindling of an ancient love. In doing so, and in responding in creative ways to the challenges posed by the process of reconciliation, the unity of our world will be strengthened, and God will be praised.
    That's all well and good, but is Purgatory just the name of a town in Colorado (and Maine)? Inquiring minds want to know.

  8. #46
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    If you want to go further on this, start a new thread, in the Religion section. In the meantime, I will restrict my comments to the topic on this thread.
    SI VIS PACEM, PARA BELLUM

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  10. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by sojourner truth View Post
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    Sin is sin, and all the same to him as far as I can see. The only sin that cannot be forgiven is non belief.
    Blasphemy?

  11. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by mac View Post
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    Blasphemy?

    Nope... Blasphemy can be forgiven too. That is assuming the person who blasphemes sees the light and is saved by belief... Then all of his sins are forgiven. Someone who denies the holy spirit is not saved and therefore cannot accept Gods forgiveness. If the nonbeliever becomes a believer, then his sin of non belief can be forgiven as well.

    Lot of people still sin after salvation... But those sins are forgiven because they have been saved by grace. Think about it a minute and it may come into focus.
    We have met the enemy and he is us... POGO

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  13. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by sojourner truth View Post
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    Nope... Blasphemy can be forgiven too. That is assuming the person who blasphemes sees the light and is saved by belief... Then all of his sins are forgiven. Someone who denies the holy spirit is not saved and therefore cannot accept Gods forgiveness. If the nonbeliever becomes a believer, then his sin of non belief can be forgiven as well.

    Lot of people still sin after salvation... But those sins are forgiven because they have been saved by grace. Think about it a minute and it may come into focus.
    well......all i know is that mark 3:22-30 (and some others) is pretty doggone clear and hard to see how it can have any need for translation or study or messaging or anything like that. It simply says what it says as in "NEVER!"......

    PS: I hope you're right......mac
    Last edited by mac; November 25th, 2018 at 12:05 AM.

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