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Rick
September 16th, 2020, 10:17 AM
Time: Wed Sep 16 8:44 PM, Visible: 6 min, Max Height: 62?, Appears: 10? above SW, Disappears: 16? above NE

As long as it doesn't get cloudy, tonight will be a great night to watch the space station.

kantwin
September 16th, 2020, 10:24 AM
I may have mentioned it here before, I can't recall.
The best sighting of the ISS I saw was when one of the shuttles was due to undock from the station as it was passing overhead.
I went out to West Fort Hood (darkest place I could think of), and saw the station and the shuttle, and they were drifting away from each other as they passed overhead.

Rick
September 16th, 2020, 10:33 AM
Tomorrow night will be good too. Six minutes, beginning at 7:56 PM.

kantwin
September 16th, 2020, 10:35 AM
The Spot the Station site says SE Alabama gets 6 minutes visible tonight, but that b!t@h Sally has other plans ....
Friday looks good -

Fri Sep 18, 7:12 PM
5 min
60?
27? above WSW
11? above NE

Johnny Frederick
September 17th, 2020, 11:01 AM
Down Load the NASA app on your phone, lot os great features.
The app will give you the location of the ISS its orbit and when it will be visible at your location.
Several times the wife and I have watched it go by from our backyard in town.
Johnny

Ludwig
September 17th, 2020, 11:43 AM
I love to sit in my backyard and watch the moon pass over. It's visible almost every night if it's not raining. Lately the mosquitoes have been just too bad tough with all the rain we've been having and all that standing water everywhere for them. I get to take a night off tonight since it's time for the "New" Moon. (It would be fun to see if I could find it and bounce a laser off it on a night like this.)

sojourner truth
September 17th, 2020, 9:07 PM
Just watched it a few minutes ago. The wife was interested in what I was up to out back for so long, and she got a good long look as well. Thanks for the tip off.

Rick
September 17th, 2020, 10:38 PM
I edited out the background noise from the pool.



https://youtu.be/CMM1yk2L32c

Ludwig
September 18th, 2020, 1:39 PM
I edited out the background noise from the pool.



https://youtu.be/CMM1yk2L32c

How lovely! Thanks for sharing.:):)

sojourner truth
September 18th, 2020, 3:36 PM
Well, gonna try again tonight to see it. I tried last night for the 9:45 or so sighting and didn't see anything.

I can remember when I was about 12 or 13, having a sleeping bag thing in the back yard with my dad. We were laying in the bags and looking at the stars and saw a satellite go over. It almost scared me. Now I am not sure if it was Sputnik or Telstar. It was one or the other as there had not been any other announced launchings that is could have been.

Rick
September 18th, 2020, 6:08 PM
The max height for the 9:36 was only 12?.

That was probably too low unless you're on a hill.

Tomorrow's will be 31?

sojourner truth
September 18th, 2020, 7:12 PM
I see that tonights sighting is 19Degrees.. And it lasts for 3 minutes. I will try and spot it, but I am doubtful as to the outcome. The projected time of the sightings are spot on, and I suspect so are the angles involved. But still, spotting it will be tough unless the arc is higher in the sky.

Should be a clear sky for a few nights too.

Rick
September 18th, 2020, 7:25 PM
The website said that it needs to be 40? or higher to be able to see it.

They won't send the email notification unless it'll be visible. Of course, they don't know weather in the area...lol

kantwin
September 18th, 2020, 8:18 PM
Good sighting opportunity here in SE AL, sunny most of the day, until late afternoon, and now it's very cloudy.

sojourner truth
September 18th, 2020, 9:34 PM
Now I am curious what the angle was last night at 8:46... The thing was high in the sky and crystal clear. At 9:46 it was not even in my picture.

Of course, the orbital path it takes changes so much, and it is hard to figure out where to look in the sky to start out with. I suppose if I get up a bit higher, it may be easier to see. If I get my 12" telescope out, maybe I can see what they are doing inside.:))

Like when I got it out last summer and was looking at the moon, and told my wife to come out and see the flag where they planted it. She actually came out and looked. Of course then when she figured out the scope wasn't quite that powerful, I was called every bad name in the book. Never knew there were that many kids of a$$holes.:))

Rick
September 19th, 2020, 3:29 AM
Thursday night was 62?.

sojourner truth
September 19th, 2020, 12:29 PM
Thursday night was 62?.

Well, tonight is 30... Maybe we'll get a peek for a few minutes. Only bad thing is the mosquitos also like that time of day/dusk.:))

sojourner truth
September 19th, 2020, 9:14 PM
Too much smoke hanging over the area from the wild fires. I could barely make out a handful of the brightest stars, and a small crescent sliver of moon. Plus, 30 Degrees is maybe a bit too low for observation around here.

Hopefully we will have a few 40 to 60 degree observation nights in the future.

Rick
September 19th, 2020, 9:50 PM
30 degrees to the north from my house isn't possible since we are on lower ground and the higher ground is to the north. I'm satisfied with seeing it the other night. Fortunate to be able to see it for that long.

Would love to view Jupitor and Saturn through your 12" scope. I'm fascinated with the view through my cheap little 4.5" scope.

kantwin
September 19th, 2020, 11:14 PM
Last year, I was able to see 4 of Jupiter's moons.
While viewing Saturn, I was struggling to try to get it in focus, only to finally realize that the "fuzz" around Saturn was the rings.
I only have a small 3" refractor scope that's reliable.
The 10" reflector alignment scope I have mounts are bent a bit, so using the finder scope doesn't align correctly.

sojourner truth
September 20th, 2020, 11:06 AM
30 degrees to the north from my house isn't possible since we are on lower ground and the higher ground is to the north. I'm satisfied with seeing it the other night. Fortunate to be able to see it for that long.

Would love to view Jupitor and Saturn through your 12" scope. I'm fascinated with the view through my cheap little 4.5" scope.

My 12" scope has been setting in my storage shed for a couple of years now. I am about ready to put it out on the curb, or call that telescope group and donate it to them. It needs a lot of work to get it back into observational peak. The mirrors are covered in shed goo. But it has a lot of extras.

Getting a glimpse of the shuttle every now and again is enough for me as well. The weather is starting to cool down, and that makes observing a bit more... tolerable.

12 " scopes are nice, but what happens is a disease called "aperture fever" where the telescope user realizes that the bigger the lens surface, the more they can see because it gathers more light. I am getting too old to drag it out of the shed and then colomate it, and then set up for a long night of observing. One of my favorite things to look at was the gas nebula in Orions belt and see the towers of creation. From using the naked eye, the area just looks like a fuzzy patch in Orion. The Indians used to call the area the "smoke star", but it isn't a star... yet. It may be, but we cannot see the current light from there for thousands of years yet.

mac
September 20th, 2020, 2:46 PM
looking at the stars and saw a satellite go over. It almost scared me. Now I am not sure if it was Sputnik or Telstar.

were sputnik and telstar both in orbit at the same time? I was kind of busy doing other stuff at that time........mac

sojourner truth
September 20th, 2020, 5:58 PM
were sputnik and telstar both in orbit at the same time? I was kind of busy doing other stuff at that time........mac


Yep.. I bet you were. I was still in my state of blissful ignorance before I went over. Still, there are some things I remember with fondness when I look back in life, and these rare quality moments with my dad always draw me closer to him even though he is gone.

I remember everyone being scared to death when Russia got Sputnik up, and the pitiful efforts we first made to try and play catchup.

Rick
September 20th, 2020, 7:05 PM
My 12" scope has been setting in my storage shed for a couple of years now. I am about ready to put it out on the curb, or call that telescope group and donate it to them. It needs a lot of work to get it back into observational peak. The mirrors are covered in shed goo. But it has a lot of extras.

Getting a glimpse of the shuttle every now and again is enough for me as well. The weather is starting to cool down, and that makes observing a bit more... tolerable.

12 " scopes are nice, but what happens is a disease called "aperture fever" where the telescope user realizes that the bigger the lens surface, the more they can see because it gathers more light. I am getting too old to drag it out of the shed and then colomate it, and then set up for a long night of observing. One of my favorite things to look at was the gas nebula in Orions belt and see the towers of creation. From using the naked eye, the area just looks like a fuzzy patch in Orion. The Indians used to call the area the "smoke star", but it isn't a star... yet. It may be, but we cannot see the current light from there for thousands of years yet.If you want to get rid of it, let me know! I'll work on it.

sojourner truth
September 20th, 2020, 9:03 PM
If you want to get rid of it, let me know! I'll work on it.

It's yours if you want it.... It needs to have the swivle base worked on, and it needs to be colomated, but I have the colomation stuff needed. If it is not properly colomated, you will see stars a bit fuzzy and with a coma on the tails of them.

Just let me know when and how you want to do it. PM me if you prefer. I think you have my address, but if not I will provide it. Better to see it used than sitting in my shed. Plus it will give me a perfect excuse to get a new one should I get a wild hair. That is how I got this one. I had an older model 12" and it was getting old, so I donated it to the astronomical society of Central Texas. I would rather see it go to someone who will really use it.

Pretty sure all it needs is some cleaning on the mirrors and basic maintenance to get it back in the game.

mac
September 21st, 2020, 1:15 AM
My 12" scope has been setting in my storage shed for a couple of years now. I am about ready to put it out on the curb, or call that telescope group and donate it to them. It needs a lot of work to get it back into observational peak. The mirrors are covered in shed goo. But it has a lot of extras.

Getting a glimpse of the shuttle every now and again is enough for me as well. The weather is starting to cool down, and that makes observing a bit more... tolerable.

12 " scopes are nice, but what happens is a disease called "aperture fever" where the telescope user realizes that the bigger the lens surface, the more they can see because it gathers more light. I am getting too old to drag it out of the shed and then colomate it, and then set up for a long night of observing. One of my favorite things to look at was the gas nebula in Orions belt and see the towers of creation. From using the naked eye, the area just looks like a fuzzy patch in Orion. The Indians used to call the area the "smoke star", but it isn't a star... yet. It may be, but we cannot see the current light from there for thousands of years yet.

yep, 6 and a half thousand to 7 thousand light years away from us......that's a prettry long haul. next time you're lookin' at it, look through what appears to be a rifle iron sight up high there and you'll see a real bright star or son......of pretty good size. I would like to know more about that thing than I do today.....mac

Rick
September 21st, 2020, 8:27 AM
It's yours if you want it.... It needs to have the swivle base worked on, and it needs to be colomated, but I have the colomation stuff needed. If it is not properly colomated, you will see stars a bit fuzzy and with a coma on the tails of them.

Just let me know when and how you want to do it. PM me if you prefer. I think you have my address, but if not I will provide it. Better to see it used than sitting in my shed. Plus it will give me a perfect excuse to get a new one should I get a wild hair. That is how I got this one. I had an older model 12" and it was getting old, so I donated it to the astronomical society of Central Texas. I would rather see it go to someone who will really use it.

Pretty sure all it needs is some cleaning on the mirrors and basic maintenance to get it back in the game.

I sent a PM. I'll have to look up collimating a telescope.

Appreciate it.

mac
September 22nd, 2020, 1:07 AM
I sent a PM. I'll have to look up collimating a telescope.

Appreciate it.

Sojourner: Don't you need a natural horizon to collumnate your scope? is it a Mead?

mac
September 22nd, 2020, 1:11 AM
Sojourner: If Rick doesn't take it, and you curb it, and my red ram pickemup puills up, please don't shoot it! It'll prob'ly be one of the sons in law....mac

sojourner truth
September 22nd, 2020, 9:13 AM
Sojourner: Don't you need a natural horizon to collumnate your scope? is it a Mead?

It is a Meade Lightbridge, and it has a laser collomation device on it. I collomated it yesterday in the garage. At least as close to collomating it as I can get.

What collomation does is align the primary mirror with the secondary mirror that reflects the light into the eyepiece. The scope has 2 eyepieces. The best collomation takes 2 people. One looking through the lens while someone else adjusts the collomation screws underneath the primary mirror while observing a star. A well collomated scope will show almost no coma on bright single point objects.

Rick is supposed to come by and get it today at lunch, or after work. If he changes his mind for some reason I will PM you. He lives in the perfect place for non light polluted observations too. One of the things with Dobsonian scopes is light pollution entering from the open sides, so I bought a curtain that fits around it to block out light. Terrible observation weather for the next few days though. That is what happened when I bought it too. Got here, and the heavens opened up for a week.:))

Rick
September 22nd, 2020, 9:47 AM
Last year, I was able to see 4 of Jupiter's moons.
While viewing Saturn, I was struggling to try to get it in focus, only to finally realize that the "fuzz" around Saturn was the rings.
I only have a small 3" refractor scope that's reliable.
The 10" reflector alignment scope I have mounts are bent a bit, so using the finder scope doesn't align correctly.

Saturn and Jupitor were great this year. I can see four moons (depending on their position) with my little scope. Also the rings of Saturn. Just for the hell of it, I tried with my Nikon binos I think they are Aculon 8x42 and I was able to see three of Jupitor's moons and Saturn's rings with those. The problem was holding them steady enough.

kantwin
September 22nd, 2020, 10:15 AM
I could not really see any distinction between the planet and the rings. To me the rings just looked like the fuzz I mentioned. Maybe a filter would help.
I could not see any color, either, just brightness.

Rick
September 22nd, 2020, 10:32 AM
I could not really see any distinction between the planet and the rings. To me the rings just looked like the fuzz I mentioned. Maybe a filter would help.
I could not see any color, either, just brightness.
I couldn't see Saturn's color either, but it was very similar to this.
8901

sojourner truth
September 22nd, 2020, 12:35 PM
I couldn't see Saturn's color either, but it was very similar to this.
8901


That is still a pretty good picture for a small scope. If it is a refractor, 4" is considered to be a very large aperture. If it is a reflector, you could probably get that much from a 6 to 8" scope. The 12" you now have should give you a little bit better picture. Not sure how to hook up a recording device to it, but there are plenty of them out there. Looks like you have figured out a good way to take snaps of objects though. If you can do it with the 12", send us all some more... When the skies clear a bit though.

Because it is a Meade.. There are a lot of available options out there as well. I tried to get a new Dobsonian swivel base for it, but couldn't find one on line. I am sure that it would be fairly simple to fabricate one with your skills and shop setup.

PS... The roller base is merely a convenience for moving that heavy beast around. You can use just the regular swivel base if you want. When you use the wheeled rig, it helps to stake it in on 4 sides so it doesn't roll around on you.

On a side note. Refractors are good for looking at solar system stuff, refractors are better for stellar objects and nebulae and such.

Rick
September 22nd, 2020, 2:20 PM
That is still a pretty good picture for a small scope. If it is a refractor, 4" is considered to be a very large aperture. If it is a reflector, you could probably get that much from a 6 to 8" scope. The 12" you now have should give you a little bit better picture. Not sure how to hook up a recording device to it, but there are plenty of them out there. Looks like you have figured out a good way to take snaps of objects though. If you can do it with the 12", send us all some more... When the skies clear a bit though.

Because it is a Meade.. There are a lot of available options out there as well. I tried to get a new Dobsonian swivel base for it, but couldn't find one on line. I am sure that it would be fairly simple to fabricate one with your skills and shop setup.

PS... The roller base is merely a convenience for moving that heavy beast around. You can use just the regular swivel base if you want. When you use the wheeled rig, it helps to stake it in on 4 sides so it doesn't roll around on you.

On a side note. Refractors are good for looking at solar system stuff, refractors are better for stellar objects and nebulae and such.

That is not my picture. I just picked that since it was the closest image that I could find to what it looked like as far as Saturn's detail. It is a 4.5 reflector I bought new from Ebay back in 2000. I bought the camera adapter for my Nikon, but it didn't work. I may try something on the 12" after I get used to it. And I'll be looking to give away the 4.5" to someone who can use it.

I see Meade has some USB cameras that might be useful.

It was nice talking to you again. Thank you for the scope. If there's anything you need, please do not hesitate to ask.

sojourner truth
September 22nd, 2020, 5:42 PM
My pleasure Rick. I would hang on to the reflector. 4.5" is pretty good aperture size for a reflector. I think the biggest I have ever seen for sale is a 5.5". Reflectors are so much cheaper, but then for stellar objective observations, they produce the best results. I just hope you can get it up and running. I am sure you can. Now... If those pesky clouds would just go away. Bell county force field seems to be holding off the rain, but not the cloud cover.

I could never figure out how they could hook a camera up in a telescope and then focus the lens properly. I do know they have hookups that go into your computer so you can see the image on a screen. Meade on line has all sorts of neat stuff.

kantwin
September 24th, 2020, 3:28 PM
This morning was supposed to be "GREAT" viewing of one of the Starlink trains.
And, of course, it was cloudy.

Rick
September 25th, 2020, 9:11 PM
My pleasure Rick. I would hang on to the reflector. 4.5" is pretty good aperture size for a reflector. I think the biggest I have ever seen for sale is a 5.5". Reflectors are so much cheaper, but then for stellar objective observations, they produce the best results. I just hope you can get it up and running. I am sure you can. Now... If those pesky clouds would just go away. Bell county force field seems to be holding off the rain, but not the cloud cover.

I could never figure out how they could hook a camera up in a telescope and then focus the lens properly. I do know they have hookups that go into your computer so you can see the image on a screen. Meade on line has all sorts of neat stuff.

Been working on it. Took it all apart and cleaned it up. The lenses look new again.

The primary mirror looks new now too. There seems to be some light rusting on the inside of the lower tube. Someone on a telescope forum suggested that I lightly sand and repaint it with flat black paint.

The base's bearings are in good shape.

I bought a couple of 24" table tops from Lowe's to use as a traverse base. I think it'll do the job.

I cut the three mount pieces tonight. I'll sand and stain them tomorrow and we just might be star gazing tomorrow night.

Thanks again. https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200926/391f432bd8fcf931720ecab0b86e2788.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200926/6f01a19d2110b74feff44565cf4494d5.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200926/526b61b092ccc648b46cc8d3a95d7a43.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200926/79630112b2ce7ae3551b7e10b8e14ffa.jpg

sojourner truth
September 25th, 2020, 10:29 PM
Been working on it. Took it all apart and cleaned it up. The lenses look new again.

The primary mirror looks new now too. There seems to be some light rusting on the inside of the lower tube. Someone on a telescope forum suggested that I lightly sand and repaint it with flat black paint.

The base's bearings are in good shape.

I bought a couple of 24" table tops from Lowe's to use as a traverse base. I think it'll do the job.

I cut the three mount pieces tonight. I'll sand and stain them tomorrow and we just might be star gazing tomorrow night.

Thanks again. https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200926/391f432bd8fcf931720ecab0b86e2788.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200926/6f01a19d2110b74feff44565cf4494d5.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200926/526b61b092ccc648b46cc8d3a95d7a43.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200926/79630112b2ce7ae3551b7e10b8e14ffa.jpg

Looks great. I knew I should have done something like that to save the thing, but I just don't have the energy to mess with it.

If you get a chance to look at something, use the big lens first. Much easier to find things in than the smaller eyepiece. Not sure, as in can't remember, but the small 12mm eyepiece is great for when you get something really far away and small you want to look at, and the larger aperture lens is better for viewing closer items, or for general viewing. The moon is great place to start, as it is hard to miss, plus it gives you time to experiment with the eyepieces and check collomation. Once you get through playing with moon watching a while, go to Jupiter or Saturn for some fun. I personally liked looking at Orions gas nebula through the thing. One other thing to use as a challenge is to check out the "eye" of Cygnus, or the head of the swan. It was my first viewing objective when I went to Mount Lick observatory and looked through their 100" scope. It has 2 stars in it, one red and the other blue, and it is a real visual treat.

Oh, and another little trick... Tell someone you found a green star. They don't exist. I have no idea why, but that is a fact.

kantwin
September 25th, 2020, 10:46 PM
Filters for looking at the moon sure help.

mac
September 26th, 2020, 1:20 AM
Looks great. I knew I should have done something like that to save the thing, but I just don't have the energy to mess with it.

If you get a chance to look at something, use the big lens first. Much easier to find things in than the smaller eyepiece. Not sure, as in can't remember, but the small 12mm eyepiece is great for when you get something really far away and small you want to look at, and the larger aperture lens is better for viewing closer items, or for general viewing. The moon is great place to start, as it is hard to miss, plus it gives you time to experiment with the eyepieces and check collomation. Once you get through playing with moon watching a while, go to Jupiter or Saturn for some fun. I personally liked looking at Orions gas nebula through the thing. One other thing to use as a challenge is to check out the "eye" of Cygnus, or the head of the swan. It was my first viewing objective when I went to Mount Lick observatory and looked through their 100" scope. It has 2 stars in it, one red and the other blue, and it is a real visual treat.

Oh, and another little trick... Tell someone you found a green star. They don't exist. I have no idea why, but that is a fact.

another little trick: you know those little circles you put around the holes of documents you want to keep in a 3 week binder....if you don't have anything else when you columnate, use 'em....they work perfect!....mac

Rick
September 26th, 2020, 6:48 AM
another little trick: you know those little circles you put around the holes of documents you want to keep in a 3 week binder....if you don't have anything else when you columnate, use 'em....they work perfect!....macThis mirror has a center mark built in.
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200926/8c323e66f3e8f6e5a1d6f99acd42d545.jpg

Rick
September 28th, 2020, 10:55 AM
I got the mount done Saturday night. I'm not entirely happy with how it came out. Mainly due to the soft pine wood I used. The elevation motion isn't as smooth as it probably should be, so I'll try to tweak it a little.

I didn't paint inside the tubes since I lightly sanded the rust out with fine grit sandpaper and it looked good and I was worried that the flat black may reflect more than the original. So while I had it apart, I painted the rings flat black since they were originally white. I like how they came out and contrast with the outside of the tubes.

The spotter sight wouldn't adjust, so I ordered a new one.

As for viewing, we just looked at the moon on Saturday night. Last night, I was able to see the moon and Jupiter with both lenses and Saturn with the wide angle lens. The rings were clearly visible and could even detect yellow color. It was pretty early, so there was still some light in the sky.

There is quite a learning curve with this one. I think the collimation is close. Our internet was out yesterday, so I didn't have YouTube for a reference.

It was funny, I was trying to find Jupiter with the higher magnification eyepiece and I knew I was in the right area, but it was just a small light, like a star and I thought something wasn't right with the collimation. Turns out, I was looking at one of its moons...lol

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200928/756980dd08a9c59384011f2934e79a88.jpg
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200928/befffcc695c3e6a03a19082ba544dd21.jpg

sojourner truth
September 28th, 2020, 12:13 PM
The original swivel mount had some sort of friction reducing material on it so that the pivot points would slide more easily when elevating or depressing the scope. There is also a clamp on the side that allows you to stop the scope from lowering due to weight. Not sure if you included that on the new mount or not.

My biggest problem was left to right motion, and it looks like you have that addressed. I figured the spotter scope would be a bugger, as it was probably pretty rusted up.

Still, sighting in on any object smaller than the moon without the spotter scope is a problem, as you have a tendency to think the scope is lower than it is. In order to see some low lying objects, you will even see horizon in with the object if you get low enough.

At any rate, enjoy the show and welcome to the wide wonderful world of astronomy for beginners. Oh, and if you are looking at Jupiter, you will be able to see all of the Galilean moons very clearly.

Rick
September 28th, 2020, 2:23 PM
I was going to get try some felt, but I do have some left over fiber gasket from a Big Green Egg that should work. It is basically, the same material as the original, just thicker. I see online that they are using some sort of teflon bearing on some now.

I moved that clamp and the eyepiece mount from the original.

sojourner truth
September 28th, 2020, 2:41 PM
I was going to get try some felt, but I do have some left over fiber gasket from a Big Green Egg that should work. It is basically, the same material as the original, just thicker. I see online that they are using some sort of teflon bearing on some now.

I moved that clamp and the eyepiece mount from the original.

That base mount looks great... The clamp, which I never knew existed until about 5 minutes before you came over, is what one needs when lowering the scope for rudimentary collimation.

Now, having said that, I wouldn't get wrapped up in collimation too much anyhow. It is good if you want crystal clear observation of individual stars, but for general observation it is not all that important.

I should have let you have one of my spotter scopes, as I have 2 laying around somewhere. They work OK if you want to get close to what you are seeing in the finder to what you are seeing in the eyepiece, and they definitely help when using the 12mm lens. I think that is the smaller one. Made for very large magnification of an object. I will look around and see if I can find one of them. If I do, it's yours for the taking.

Rick
September 28th, 2020, 2:48 PM
That base mount looks great... The clamp, which I never knew existed until about 5 minutes before you came over, is what one needs when lowering the scope for rudimentary collimation.

Now, having said that, I wouldn't get wrapped up in collimation too much anyhow. It is good if you want crystal clear observation of individual stars, but for general observation it is not all that important.

I should have let you have one of my spotter scopes, as I have 2 laying around somewhere. They work OK if you want to get close to what you are seeing in the finder to what you are seeing in the eyepiece, and they definitely help when using the 12mm lens. I think that is the smaller one. Made for very large magnification of an object. I will look around and see if I can find one of them. If I do, it's yours for the taking.

You've been generous enough. The one I ordered is about the same as the original, except there's an option for a green reticle. They do make a mount for two spotting sights.

Rick
September 28th, 2020, 8:32 PM
The gasket material is perfect. Thick enough so that it doesn't rock in the cradle anymore and it is snug enough so that it doesn't drop when it's part way down.

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200929/5a5f273683a92a82feff73ba41c83551.jpg

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

Rick
September 30th, 2020, 11:16 AM
Here are some sighting opportunities coming up.

8908

Rick
October 1st, 2020, 8:59 AM
The spotting sight came in and I was able to align it near perfectly.

Saw several of Jupiter's "stripes" and my wife was excited to see Saturn so vividly.

Just for giggles, last night, I put my phone up against the wide angle eyepiece and took this picture Jupiter and three moons.
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20201001/18f3adba9bd1c89fec9c2278df3f80ac.jpg

sojourner truth
October 2nd, 2020, 10:04 AM
Yep... I tried that too, and never could get a good pic off of my phone. Most times, you can spot 5 moons if they are in the right place.

One of the things that got me when I first looked through a telescope lens was just how many stars one can see that you can't see with the naked eye. They are everywhere.

Rick
October 7th, 2020, 10:04 AM
Tonight!!!

Time: Wed Oct 07 8:24 PM, Visible: 4 min, Max Height: 84?, Appears: 11? above NW, Disappears: 49? above SE

sojourner truth
October 7th, 2020, 1:09 PM
Yep... I thought that might be high enough to see. Still trying to figure out how it will go from NW to SE. Most of the time it goes from west to east, but not to the southeast from the northwest.

mac
October 7th, 2020, 3:34 PM
Yep... I thought that might be high enough to see. Still trying to figure out how it will go from NW to SE. Most of the time it goes from west to east, but not to the southeast from the northwest.

I guess I kind of thought that satellites not in synchronous stationary orbit always, well almost always went from NW to SE 'cept on re-entry.....I mean, if it wasn't a diagonal spiral, it'd be the same ole orbit, each and every time and the same ole latitude all the time and we'd know a lot about what was on earth below that particular latitude line but nothing about the rest of the earth and you .....could forget about your GPS....mac

kantwin
October 7th, 2020, 4:28 PM
I guess I kind of thought that satellites not in synchronous stationary orbit always, well almost always went from NW to SE 'cept on re-entry.....I mean, if it wasn't a diagonal spiral, it'd be the same ole orbit, each and every time and the same ole latitude all the time and we'd know a lot about what was on earth below that particular latitude line but nothing about the rest of the earth and you .....could forget about your GPS....mac
If they always go NW to SE, how do they ever get back to the NW so they can go SE?
{rhetorical question}

Rick
October 7th, 2020, 5:12 PM
Here's a snip of the orbit. I guess by tonight, it will be somewhat close to the path that I drew in red.

8916

sojourner truth
October 7th, 2020, 5:51 PM
Well, I just went to the spot the station web site and learned an interesting fact. The station is only visible if it is above 40 Degrees of elevation. Anything less than that and it is too low. And, it has to be at just the right time for the sunlight to catch it at the right angle to reflect the surface back to earth.

I will take a good look tonight as it seems like the angle may be good enough to spot it. Tonight and perhaps even a night later on in the week.

Ludwig
October 7th, 2020, 7:02 PM
There's no mystery. NASA can tell you when and where you can see that wingless monstrosity.

kantwin
October 7th, 2020, 8:07 PM
For me, this is the one to see this week.



Fri Oct 9, 6:51 PM
6 min
87?
10? above NW
11? above SE

sojourner truth
October 7th, 2020, 9:45 PM
It was a little cloudy tonight, but I still got to see the ISS pop in and out of the clouds every now and again. Had to watch it with the dog since the wife was watching the Yankees getting their lunch handed to them. All the dog was interested in was checking out her next spot to make a "deposit" in the grass. She was ready to go after we came back in and listened to a bit of the VP debate.

Hope tomorrow nights viewing goes well, and look forward to it.

Rick
October 7th, 2020, 10:12 PM
We saw it too. Always amazing to see.

mac
October 8th, 2020, 12:19 AM
If they always go NW to SE, how do they ever get back to the NW so they can go SE?
{rhetorical question}

Clear as mud to this ole coon, think about a mobius strip...... or better yet, the same way Columbus, Balboa and a few of those ole boys got to the east by goin' west.....mac (rhetorical answer)

Rick
October 8th, 2020, 4:41 PM
Tonight's viewing! Not sure if I'll be able to see it unless I go to the southern part of the property. We'll see.

Time: Thu Oct 08 7:36 PM, Visible: 6 min, Max Height: 41?, Appears: 10? above NNW, Disappears: 11? above ESE

kantwin
October 8th, 2020, 4:46 PM
41* is still pretty high up. You should be able to see it.

Rick
October 8th, 2020, 4:56 PM
We're in the Lampasas river valley and it goes uphill to the north of us. Some good size trees to the north may block the view.

The viewing should be better if I hop in the side by side and drive south across the field.

mac
October 8th, 2020, 7:13 PM
We're in the Lampasas river valley and it goes uphill to the north of us. Some good size trees to the north may block the view.

The viewing should be better if I hop in the side by side and drive south across the field.

or just driving up to the top of the offending hill, crest or divide......but, yeow, the further south you go will cut down on your 'slope' angle.....mac

Rick
October 8th, 2020, 7:20 PM
If the clouds don't clear, it'll be a moot point anyway.

sojourner truth
October 8th, 2020, 7:54 PM
Clear skies in HH so far. Maybe we will get lucky. I still need to get a clear view of the North, as if I don't catch the thing when it first appears, I have a hard time finding it.

Rick, if you want to pull a fast one on the wife, pull out the scope and tell her you can spot someone waving from the thing. Or someone walking around inside with no clothes on.:))

sojourner truth
October 8th, 2020, 9:09 PM
Well, the clouds rolled in and I didn't get a glimpse this time around... Maybe later.

Rick
October 8th, 2020, 9:36 PM
LOL ya, I don't think it'll fool her.

We had a great view tonight. Almost no clouds, and it went right over the house.
8917

sojourner truth
October 10th, 2020, 8:51 PM
I got a great view tonight... The guide said it would appear at 7:40 and last for 4 minutes... I tracked it from about 7:35 until 7:45 and it was clear as a bell. There was an airplane flying almost the same direction that had a very bright directional beacon light and it was doing its best to keep up, but it lost big time.

Great sighting tonight.

Rick
October 10th, 2020, 8:57 PM
I forgot to post tonight's times. It was strange. We could see the space station, but there was another object that was seemingly following it with a light that was very intermittent. It wasn't flashing like a plane. There was no pattern to the flashing.

kantwin
October 10th, 2020, 8:58 PM
The great sighting on tap for yesterday here was a bust due to overcast skies.

sojourner truth
October 11th, 2020, 2:26 PM
I forgot to post tonight's times. It was strange. We could see the space station, but there was another object that was seemingly following it with a light that was very intermittent. It wasn't flashing like a plane. There was no pattern to the flashing.

I saw it too, but attributed it to an airplanes anti collision lighting. Never seen on quite that bright though. LGM and BEMs following the ISS?

sojourner truth
October 11th, 2020, 9:01 PM
Well, I was going to say that tonights ISS observation was a bust, but I got an unexpected pleasure of seeing a different satellite moving from NE to SW slowly going across the heavens. Not even sure which one it was, but it was pretty neat. It cut right across Orions belt too, and I got a good naked eye view of Orion in all its glory, (about 7:45 to 7:55). The max elevation of this visitor was about 80 degrees or better.

Gave me a new appreciation of naked eye viewing again.

Rick
October 22nd, 2020, 8:30 AM
A good view this morning from the parking lot at work. Pointed it out to a co-worker who didn't believe me. I also showed him Venus, he didn't believe that either...lol

Rick
November 10th, 2020, 8:10 PM
Good viewing for early birds tomorrow morning.

Time: Wed Nov 11 6:04 AM, Visible: 6 min, Max Height: 57?, Appears: 15? above NW, Disappears: 10? above SSE

sojourner truth
November 10th, 2020, 9:47 PM
I love watching that thing, but my wife and I usually get up at the crack of noon... Unless she is having a rough night sleeping, and then she may get up, but usually leaves me in dreamland.

I have noticed this recent propensity for the ISS to show itself at early am hours, and assume that the math of orbital dynamics makes that a regular thing. Hopefully the status will return to favor evening observations, but as days get shorter, it becomes doubtful.

Either that or I will have to start getting my butt out of bed earlier... Naaah. Never happen.:))

sojourner truth
November 16th, 2020, 7:57 PM
Just watched it go over the house... Clear and bright, and you could see the Dragon capsule chugging along right behind it.

Dragon wasn't nearly as bright, being so much smaller, but it was definitely seeable. I suppose they will mate up about 11PM tonight and get the new ISS members aboard.

I was also noticing today that the new Space Launch System is overbudget and behind schedule as well. Those folks making things for NASA really know how to milk out a career. Still waiting for someone to grow a pair and cancel or launch the James Webb Space Telescope... Supposed to launch 10 years ago and then went over budget and over time. Go figure. No wonder we are starting to suck at space exploration. It will take enterprising investors to get us to the moon and Mars.

Rick
November 16th, 2020, 8:14 PM
That's cool. I didn't get notified since it wasn't higher than 40?.

I wish I had looked anyway.

sojourner truth
November 17th, 2020, 1:30 PM
That's cool. I didn't get notified since it wasn't higher than 40?.

I wish I had looked anyway.

Normally, I wouldn't look either, but I was out front taking the trash can out anyway, so I stayed out until the right time, and there it was. Not sure what the elevation parameters are for the thing, but when it is in the South or anywhere near that, it gets pretty predictable.

At any rate, I enjoyed the view.

Rick
November 18th, 2020, 8:48 AM
Tonight! Should be good viewing if no clouds.

Time: Wed Nov 18 6:48 PM, Visible: 3 min, Max Height: 67?, Appears: 28? above WSW, Disappears: 37? above NNE

sojourner truth
November 18th, 2020, 7:05 PM
The wife and I actually watched it for about 2 minutes last night. Very low in the south, moving to the southeast. First time we have watched it together.

sojourner truth
November 18th, 2020, 8:16 PM
Tonight we got a twofer... Towards the end of the ISS flight there was another satellite moving in the same general direction but a lot dimmer. It even lasted a few seconds longer that the ISS. My wife and I watched from the front yard tonight. Great show.

Rick
November 18th, 2020, 10:00 PM
We saw the second satellite too.

Rick
November 19th, 2020, 9:06 AM
Tonight!

Time: Thu Nov 19 6:00 PM, Visible: 6 min, Max Height: 58?, Appears: 16? above SSW, Disappears: 10? above NE

sojourner truth
November 19th, 2020, 5:38 PM
Last nights path for ISS took it through the swan, and if you look at the "head" of the swan, you will see a double star. Cygnus has, at its head, one of astronomys biggest hits. I first saw it through the 100" telescope at Mt. Lick observatory and it is a double star system.... one is blue and the other one is red and it is a beautiful contrast to get in one frame of the eyepiece.

Most observatories, if and when visited, will try and use them as an observation article for visitors. Through a 12" telescope, it is almost as neat... May want to give it a shot Rick. Good luck.

sojourner truth
November 19th, 2020, 7:17 PM
ANother twofer tonight... The other satellite moves almost straight south to north, or close to it. Has me curious as to which one it is. But the ISS was clear and bright. Great viewing tonight, and I used a nice set of binoculars to watch it all.

mac
November 19th, 2020, 8:15 PM
Last nights path for ISS took it through the swan,

no it didn't.....but you're right, it really is pretty and impressive and the colors can almost be mind blowing,.......... even though, to me, What I'm told is blue is actually, to my eye, more like a green but still a real knock out......

Rick
November 19th, 2020, 8:49 PM
Didn't see two tonight. I'm pretty sure you can see multiple satellites every night.

It did do a flyby of the moon though.


https://youtu.be/1H2db2j4PKU

sojourner truth
November 19th, 2020, 8:52 PM
Well, I am pretty sure it was Cygnus that the ISS went straight through last night from head to tail... Almost directly through the middle of it. Have to look it up to be sure I have my constellations straight.

It would be nice to have a green star, but that is one of the colors of the spectrum that does not happen naturally, I am afraid.

Blue white yellow red are plentiful. Red stars are the longest lived and the smallest and the hardest to see unless they are giants in the end stages of life like Betelgeuse in the Orion constellation. I also see that the Pleiades are out and that means that soon Orion will be out in full, and the pillars of creation and the Eagle nebula will be visible through a moderate scope.

I kept seeing a large red thing in the south eastern sky and guessed it was a planet, so when I looked through my spotter scope I thought I saw rings and guessed that it was Saturn, or at least some other planetary body and my lens was not well focused and had aberrations in the view.

kantwin
November 20th, 2020, 6:23 AM
Jupiter and Saturn are high in the sky, to the south, at sunset. Mars is probably 10 degrees up at sunset.

kantwin
November 20th, 2020, 6:42 AM
A good program to help identify stars and planets is called Stellarium.
It?s available for PC and mobile ( phone, tablet )
It is kind of geeky, and some of the button icons are hard to figure out.
If you have a smartphone or tablet, I highly recommend SkyWalk2.
It has some in-app purchases that will let you track satellites also, so you could know what was your two-fer. Probably an uninteresting communication satellite.
SpaceX has been launching Starlink satellites, and they were making trails of 20 or so satellites, from what I understand, but never witnessed. Plenty of videos on that. Would have been neat to see.
Many astronomers complained, so SpaceX angled them to not be so bright.

Rick
November 20th, 2020, 8:38 AM
A good program to help identify stars and planets is called Stellarium.
It?s available for PC and mobile ( phone, tablet )
It is kind of geeky, and some of the button icons are hard to figure out.
If you have a smartphone or tablet, I highly recommend SkyWalk2.
It has some in-app purchases that will let you track satellites also, so you could know what was your two-fer. Probably an uninteresting communication satellite.
SpaceX has been launching Starlink satellites, and they were making trails of 20 or so satellites, from what I understand, but never witnessed. Plenty of videos on that. Would have been neat to see.
Many astronomers complained, so SpaceX angled them to not be so bright.
Do you mean Star Walk 2?

Skywalk is some Bengali education app...lol

kantwin
November 20th, 2020, 10:08 AM
Yeah.
Star walk...

mac
November 20th, 2020, 2:14 PM
Well, I am pretty sure it was Cygnus that the ISS went straight through last night from head to tail... Almost directly through the middle of it.

But Sojourner, It's thousands of light years away from us and even though I don't pay nearly as much attention to this sort of thing as I used to, I wasn't aware that we had yet sent anything that far away, let alone through it!......my bad.......mac

sojourner truth
November 20th, 2020, 5:20 PM
But Sojourner, It's thousands of light years away from us and even though I don't pay nearly as much attention to this sort of thing as I used to, I wasn't aware that we had yet sent anything that far away, let alone through it!......my bad.......mac

We have a Unicorn Fart powered rocket that went there years ago, and it had the ISS on it.

Ludwig
November 20th, 2020, 5:37 PM
We have a Unicorn Fart powered rocket that went there years ago, and it had the ISS on it.A journey and a feat made so much more difficult since those entities making up that image are not as they seem, on a level plane.

sojourner truth
November 20th, 2020, 7:29 PM
FTL travel... It can go from one to the other in a matter of seconds...

Want a real mind blower? Look at any constellation as we see it from planet earth and then look at the reality of where the stars really are. The first one that comes to mind is the big Dipper (Ursa Majoris, I think). Nothing like what we see it as from Earth.

sojourner truth
November 20th, 2020, 9:19 PM
Short view tonight. Just a few minutes far to the northeast and low in the sky, but seeable. The wife trudges out, reluctantly, with me to watch. She gets a kick out of seeing me get excited about something any more. Talk about a cheap date. But I love her more than anything.

Now, I am sitting here watching Noah, the dumbest most anti biblical rendition of anything I have ever seen, and listening to the wife and dog snore.

Life gets simple, and enjoyable for the smallest reasons any more.

mac
November 21st, 2020, 12:22 AM
A journey and a feat made so much more difficult since those entities making up that image are not as they seem, on a level plane.

what is level in space?

Rick
November 21st, 2020, 3:08 AM
I saw it in the western sky tonight, but I also saw a really bright satellite moving from north to south at the same time.

sojourner truth
November 21st, 2020, 11:07 AM
Yep... The one we have been watching lately usually travels from south to north in pretty much a straight line. Usually about the same time as the ISS, but it moves a lot faster.

sojourner truth
December 6th, 2020, 8:45 PM
Well, My wife and I found ity tonight. Spotted it low on the northern horizon, and it moved to the east slightly while rising higher in our point of observation. Of course, it always fades away when it dips below a certain point in its orbit.

mac
December 6th, 2020, 11:58 PM
Well, My wife and I found it tonight. Spotted it low on the northern horizon, and it moved to the east slightly while rising higher in our point of observation. Of course, it always fades away when it dips below a certain point in its orbit.

prime should be on 21 inst., Sojourner and right now, the weather looks good and warm....wow, i'm amazed you could cut thru all the light pollution to get to the N Horizon or even low up a bit (3 fingers?). I can't do that from my place and I'm only a little bit nnw of you! I can always get Polaris and Cassiopeia wnw but that's about it for me lookin' to the north from my address.............got any little tricks or tips you might want to share?.....mac

Night Owl
December 7th, 2020, 2:37 PM
prime should be on 21 inst., Sojourner and right now, the weather looks good and warm....wow, i'm amazed you could cut thru all the light pollution to get to the N Horizon or even low up a bit (3 fingers?). I can't do that from my place and I'm only a little bit nnw of you! I can always get Polaris and Cassiopeia wnw but that's about it for me lookin' to the north from my address.............got any little tricks or tips you might want to share?.....mac
Climb a ladder and get on the roof.:))

sojourner truth
December 7th, 2020, 4:42 PM
That might work, but I can see pretty much everything above the Seton/ Wal Mart line to my North, until I run into my neighbors ash tree which blocks the view to the east.

If the ISS is coming from the South, better viewing for me is in the front yard. I have had a number of folks stop by and ask me what I am looking at, and then they get excited to stay and see if it really does come over.

I have gotten pretty good at guessing where it will show up.

Rick
December 7th, 2020, 4:53 PM
got any little tricks or tips you might want to share?.....mac
Become an astronaut? :))

Ludwig
December 7th, 2020, 5:21 PM
Look to the sky through a tube.

kantwin
December 7th, 2020, 7:24 PM
I have to go down the street to see more than a little sliver of sky, due to all the trees in my yard.
I typically will go down to the lake.
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20201208/38651aac41d261a83682fde846d12fca.jpg

sojourner truth
December 7th, 2020, 7:32 PM
Well, tonight it showed up on time, but not exactly where I thought it would be. More directly north, and travelling to the northeast. But it was visible for a good 4 minutes. And we gotr a bonus when we first went out back. A meteorite at about 6:15 went from east to west, and it was very bright.

There is usually an onslaught of meteorite activity this tome of year, but usually from about midnight on to dawn. This one was an early bird. And it lasted a long time too. I kept thinking it would probably land somewhere in west Texas. Like CC or Lampassas or something.:)

mac
December 7th, 2020, 7:36 PM
Climb a ladder and get on the roof.:))

it's not lookin' over things that's the problem, Owl, it's trying to cut through all that Killeen/copperas cove light pollution up in the air and atmosphere..........mac

sojourner truth
December 7th, 2020, 7:41 PM
You don't live that far from me, and I have no problem with light or air pollution. Unless I am using a telescope, which I don't have any more.

One has to live in the sticks to get little to no light pollution. Rick has a good spot. My daughters ex has a nice spot out in Ding Dong that would make an excellent scope spot.

The problems I have are 2 story roofs and trees. Lot of 2 story houses built on the hills around me.

mac
December 7th, 2020, 8:38 PM
You don't live that far from me, and I have no problem with light or air pollution. Unless I am using a telescope, which I don't have any more.

One has to live in the sticks to get little to no light pollution. Rick has a good spot. My daughters ex has a nice spot out in Ding Dong that would make an excellent scope spot.

The problems I have are 2 story roofs and trees. Lot of 2 story houses built on the hills around me.

yeah, ok, I'm prob'ly mixin' apples and beans....if your scope elevation is above a 2 story ridge line, you're at one hell of a lot of more 'tilt' than i was referring too.........i should've remembered that you're a "high angle" guy....mac

Night Owl
December 7th, 2020, 9:29 PM
it's not lookin' over things that's the problem, Owl, it's trying to cut through all that Killeen/copperas cove light pollution up in the air and atmosphere..........mac
Wear sunglasses.:))

mac
December 8th, 2020, 12:04 AM
Wear sunglasses.:))

I guess it's either that or move out on top of Manning Mountain on Ft. Hood.....as it is right now, other than the 2 I just mentioned I can never see anything out there in the northern skies. .... and there's some real good stuff out thataway.......

Hmmm, come to think of it, I know exactly where there's some excess pyro and 6 road wheels buried out there that maybe I could salvage.....anybody know what those recyclers are paying for road wheels today?....lots of magnesium in 'em......Grasshopper, are you listenin'?....I might just have a 12 digit grid and photo for sale......mac (just kiddin', CID)

Night Owl
December 8th, 2020, 2:08 AM
My batteries put a bunch of fragments all around and on top of Smith Mountain. Had the duty once to go and clean some of stuff out that way.

Rick
December 8th, 2020, 11:08 AM
Tonight.

Time: Tue Dec 08 7:10 PM, Visible: 3 min, Max Height: 57?, Appears: 10? above NW, Disappears: 56? above SW

sojourner truth
December 8th, 2020, 2:00 PM
Should be a great show.. I am wondering if anyone else saw the meteorite at about 6:15 last night. I shook me up for a second, because it was so bright and unexpected.

kantwin
December 8th, 2020, 2:16 PM
Should be a great show.. I am wondering if anyone else saw the meteorite at about 6:15 last night. I shook me up for a second, because it was so bright and unexpected.
Lemme split a hair with you -
Are you sure it was a metorite, that survived entry into the earth atmosphere and impacted the earth?
Or was it just a metor?

We now return you to your regularly scheduled program.

sojourner truth
December 8th, 2020, 6:17 PM
If my memory serves, Meteor and meteorite are terms for objects that enter the atmosphere. Meteoroids are the ones that hit the ground. But then, I have been known to be wrong before.:)

Rick
December 8th, 2020, 8:17 PM
Saw it tonight.

sojourner truth
December 8th, 2020, 8:53 PM
Yep... Me too. Nice and high in the sky. It almost looked like 2 objects either linked together or in a synchronous orbit. Wonder if it is the resupply module I saw.

On a side note... Elon Musk has called it quits on California and decided to move to Texas. Well, at least on Californian has something besides a hat rack on his shoulders. He said that California was acting like an entitled sports team that expects to be in the playoffs every year, and that some of the gold is tarnishing. And he is 100% correct. I just hope he decides to relocate all of his Tesla assets here and hire local.

Night Owl
December 8th, 2020, 9:43 PM
If my memory serves, Meteor and meteorite are terms for objects that enter the atmosphere. Meteoroids are the ones that hit the ground. But then, I have been known to be wrong before.:)
When?:))

Rick
December 9th, 2020, 8:43 AM
Tonight!

Time: Wed Dec 09 6:22 PM, Visible: 6 min, Max Height: 68?, Appears: 11? above NW, Disappears: 10? above SE

mac
December 9th, 2020, 2:57 PM
Tonight!

Time: Wed Dec 09 6:22 PM, Visible: 6 min, Max Height: 68?, Appears: 11? above NW, Disappears: 10? above SE

let's see now..........how many fingers would that be....or mils....... hope my finger is still 30 mils....

Rick
December 9th, 2020, 4:06 PM
Just look for the brightest, fastest moving thing that doesn't have flashing lights.

sojourner truth
December 9th, 2020, 5:28 PM
It should pass overhead pretty much directly overhead at those elevations. The hardest thing I have found is that the directions given for location are a bit off, or at least so generalized as to be "in the ballpark" only. But it is easy enough to spot if you go out early and wait for it. What gets me is hoe it fades into view and gets very bright, and then fades out as it dips under the sun/earth horizon.

I am also getting used to it being dark by 6pm as well. I thought how unusual it is to be looking for something in low earth orbit at about 6pm, but then it occurred to me that the horizon for sunlight shining on an orbiting object could make something visible easily. Hoping to see some more meteorites (meteors) tonight as well. Tis the season.

kantwin
December 9th, 2020, 7:19 PM
What gets me is hoe it fades into view and gets very bright, and then fades out as it dips under the sun/earth horizon.

If I'm not mistaken, I believe that has something to do with terminator, or the line between dark and sunlight. I could be completely wrong on that, though.

kantwin
December 9th, 2020, 7:34 PM
I went out and got a glimpse of it tonight between the trees. Max height was 26*
Tomorrow is supposed to be up to 53* height.

Rick
December 9th, 2020, 7:34 PM
Great view tonight. It got really bright toward before it went out of sight. Must have been the angle of the solar panels reflecting the sun.

I think we saw a couple meteor flashes while watching it.

kantwin
December 9th, 2020, 7:41 PM
This weekend should be prime viewing for the Geminids meteor shower. The evening of the 13th into the morning of the 14th. Look to the east, starting around 10PM.

sojourner truth
December 9th, 2020, 8:15 PM
Yep... Nice view tonight. And we saw a couple of shootin' stars as well. The ones we saw were going from south to north, which is unusual. Looking forward to the Geminids this year.. They say they are supposed to be exceptionally prolific. But then they say that every year.

Normally, meteorites come from the east and go west, but the hours they are best viewed are late, and us old farts need to get to bed early. Something about the earth facing a certain way as it flies around the solar orbit.

mac
December 10th, 2020, 1:00 AM
The ones we saw were going from south to north, which is unusual.

Yeppers, that's real unusual.....ass backwards.....almost upside down so to speak (as if there were an up and down out there). Wish I hadn't missed it....mac

sojourner truth
December 10th, 2020, 2:27 PM
Like in Enders game... In space, there is no down or up.

Watching the meteor shower is almost an annual ritual for me, but it is getting to where my patience and intolerance to cold is squelching that plan. I do hope to make it out after 10PM a few times this year around, but it is like putting up Christmas decorations any more. I am getting a bit long in the tooth for that sort of thing. The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak and all that stuff... I usually get out a lawn lounge chair and lie down in the back yard to watch. Any more, I fall asleep before the shower gets good.:))

kantwin
December 10th, 2020, 6:50 PM
Tonight pass was almost a bust.
It was supposed to appear NNW, disappear S, visible for 6 minutes. I was looking, and saw a satellite coming from the NNE heading S. I thought, OK, maybe I misremembered.
As I was watching it, I was thinking that it wasn't as bright as it was yesterday.
But, yesterday was an hour later, maybe that had something to do with it.
I watched this one for almost 3 minutes, and as I turned to face more to the south, out of the corner of my eye was the bright ISS...
The tracks of them did cross, but about 30 seconds apart.
Not sure which satellite I was watching.
Next real good opportunity for me -


Sat Dec 19, 5:32 AM
6 min
58?
11? above SSW
10? above NE

sojourner truth
December 10th, 2020, 8:32 PM
I went out at exactly 7:15, and actually saw it. Far to the south and west, barely over the tree tops for me, but it lasted for about 3 minutes... Which was 2 minutes longer than advertised.

Not as bright, and not as flashy as usual, but still seeable. Have to be careful in the backyard so as not to step on an IED... Invisible excrement of dog.

Johnny Frederick
December 11th, 2020, 3:17 PM
I was in South Dakota last week Hunting. We were near Chamberlain SD right by the river.
The sky was clear and only lights were from a small town in the distance.
Great views. Sunday got to watch the ISS from horizon to horizon and several other times ISS and other satellites at the same time.
The news said the northern lights would be visible Thursday and Friday nights. Had to get home so missed that.
Johnny

mac
December 11th, 2020, 4:10 PM
I was in South Dakota last week Hunting.

must've been hunting birds............i think season on all hooved animals is closed by now, aren't they?...how'd you do? upland or water fowl?....mac

Johnny Frederick
December 11th, 2020, 5:38 PM
Pheasant hunting
Thunderstick Lodge Chamberlain SD. On a bluff overlooking the Missouri river. Great lodge with great guides & dogs, limits each of 3 days.
This was my third trip in the last 2 years. First time it was 12 degrees and a foot of snow on the ground.
This week 35-65 degrees and sunshine.
Johnny

mac
December 12th, 2020, 12:26 AM
Pheasant hunting
Thunderstick Lodge Chamberlain SD. On a bluff overlooking the Missouri river. Great lodge with great guides & dogs, limits each of 3 days.
This was my third trip in the last 2 years. First time it was 12 degrees and a foot of snow on the ground.
This week 35-65 degrees and sunshine.
Johnny

Planted????????????

are you a member of PU too? i saw you once at a DU thing not all that long ago but before my ha....as a matter of fact, I won a carved decoy at that one.....someone's idea of what a Pintail Drake (old squaw) is supposed to look like.............not too bad though, still keepin' it....mac

Johnny Frederick
December 12th, 2020, 12:21 PM
Some planted mostly wild birds. Have not joined Pheasants Forever still a DU guy.

Duck hunting is still my passion.
Johnny

mac
December 12th, 2020, 12:39 PM
Some planted mostly wild birds. Have not joined Pheasants Forever still a DU guy.

Duck hunting is still my passion.
Johnny

sojourner truth
December 13th, 2020, 12:49 PM
Saw some great shooting stars last night about 7pm. Clear and bright just overhead. Moving from east to west as they normally do.

kantwin
December 13th, 2020, 2:33 PM
Overcast skies the next few night, so no Geminids here.

Rick
December 16th, 2020, 7:42 PM
Nice view of three planets and a moon.https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20201217/fda352447d7e6b7a7597b36a344c4fd1.jpg

kantwin
December 16th, 2020, 8:16 PM
What is the 3rd planet? Earth, I suppose?
Many years ago there was a PBS 5 minute show once a week called "Star Hustler", and one week, back in the late 80's, the host made a point to say that you could see all the naked eye planets at the same time. Sure enough, right after sunset, I could see Mercury and Venus was close by. I was standing on Earth, of course, and Mars, Jupiter and Saturn were all up as well.
Mercury can be a tough one to spot, since it is so close to the sun.

Rick
December 16th, 2020, 9:40 PM
You got it, it's earth...lol

mac
December 17th, 2020, 12:50 AM
What is the 3rd planet? Earth, I suppose?
Many years ago there was a PBS 5 minute show once a week called "Star Hustler", and one week, back in the late 80's, the host made a point to say that you could see all the naked eye planets at the same time. Sure enough, right after sunset, I could see Mercury and Venus was close by. I was standing on Earth, of course, and Mars, Jupiter and Saturn were all up as well.
Mercury can be a tough one to spot, since it is so close to the sun.

Nope! not correct, Kantwin. Someone fed you a bowl of scat, you might wanna tell whoever it was that they need to be sure of things before repeating them........mac

mac
December 17th, 2020, 12:53 AM
You got it, it's earth...lol

yeppers, sometimes even referred to as the "3rd rock from the song". Hmm, that oughtta make a good song title.....mac

Rick
December 17th, 2020, 5:47 AM
yeppers, sometimes even referred to as the "3rd rock from the song". Hmm, that oughtta make a good song title.....macI've never heard of "3rd rock from the song".

I have heard of "3rd rock from the sun".

kantwin
December 17th, 2020, 6:08 AM
Nope! not correct, Kantwin. Someone fed you a bowl of scat, you might wanna tell whoever it was that they need to be sure of things before repeating them........mac

Please, be specific in what you perceive to be incorrect in what I posted.

gnatsum
December 17th, 2020, 8:51 AM
yeppers, sometimes even referred to as the "3rd rock from the song". Hmm, that oughtta make a good song title.....mac

Was that sarcasm? There WAS a country song several years ago called 'Third Rock from the Sun". Don't remember much of it, but the country parody singer Cletus T. Judd did a version of it called 'Third Rock From Her Thumb'.

And of course, who can forgot the now-classic TV series '3rd Rock from the Sun', featuring a team of aliens who came to Earth for study and research purposes...

kantwin
December 19th, 2020, 8:12 AM
iPhone photo of Jupiter and Saturn, thorough the trees.
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20201219/e4b24d7e0260e9755e93459d811434ba.jpg

sojourner truth
January 15th, 2021, 11:45 AM
Well, the ISS was up and over for a few minutes last night. Looked good. Tonight another go at it.

sojourner truth
January 15th, 2021, 9:38 PM
Friday night .... good show... Saturday should be even better as the elevation is so high.